Category Archives: Alumnae/i

Overview of the Iterative Algorithm for Phase Retrieval

In the previous post, the reason that only oversampled patterns can be reconstructed was introduced.
The next question is then–how do we construct these patterns and how can we retrieve the phase quantitatively? Here’s a overview of the iterative algorithm that … Continue reading

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Dummies Intro to Oversampling Phasing Method

Before introducing the concept of oversampling, let’s first talk about an effect named “aliasing” that is just as important.
Aliasing

An example of aliasing can be seen in old movies, especially when watching wagon wheels on old Western films. You would occasionally … Continue reading

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Brief Introduction to the famous “Phase Problem”

In physics the phase problem is the name given to the problem of loss of information concerning the phase that can occur when making a physical measurement. The name itself comes from the field of x-ray crystallography, where the phase … Continue reading

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A few other research projects conducted around the world for C. elegans

“The link between C. elegans‘ physical and neurological responses to vibrations”
” Impact of environmental toxins on the development and reproduction of the nematode, C. Elegans.”
“Utilizing C. elegans’s brain wiring to run an electronic robot that could one day be a model for a cheap, artificial … Continue reading

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The Start of the Journey with C. elegans

“C. elegans has become a favorite model system for the study of development due to the recent discovery that its genetic makeup differs very little from that of a fly, fish, mouse, or human.”
–Professor Greg Hermann
 
C. Elegans.
I never actually thought that … Continue reading

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Current and Former Research Students

Alexandra Bello
Vassar College Class of 2012
Physics Major
Current Student
Presented URSI work at the Frontier in Optics OSA annual meeting at the University of Rochester
Rebecca Eells
Vassar College Class of  2012
Physics Major
Current Student
Presented URSI work at the Frontier in Optics OSA annual meeting … Continue reading

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Applications

Chitin and chitosan have a large number of commercial applications due to unusual and often unstudied properties of both compounds. Both are found in many commonly used products as well as products being tested for consumer use. They will probably … Continue reading

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Chitin and Chitosan Molecules

Chitin

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Chitosan: a Derivative of Chitin

The most commercially useful derivative of chitin is chitosan. It is made by the deacetylation of the pure chitin compound. Typically, pure chitin is harvested from shrimp, crab and lobster shells disposed of by restaurants. In this process, an acetyl … Continue reading

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Basic Chemical Structure

Chitin was discovered in 1811 by Henri Braconnot, a chemist who worked mostly with plants and fungi. He originally named it fungine, because it was a main structural component in fungi cell walls. In 1823, chitin was found in … Continue reading

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