Author Archives: mahayes

Recognizing an Altered Landscape; Memories from an Archaeological Investigation at Trapps Gap

By Chloe McGuire If you ever find yourself in the position to visit the Shawangunk (pronounced: SHOM-GUN) Mountains running through upstate New York, about 12 miles from the Hudson River and 100 miles outside New York City, you absolutely must … Continue reading

Posted in Tourism | Comments Off on Recognizing an Altered Landscape; Memories from an Archaeological Investigation at Trapps Gap

Conservation at the Mohonk Mountain House

By Kim Kogler Europeans first arriving in the United States brought not only their bodies and personal belongings, but also thousands of new plants and animals. The European customs, plants, and animals dissipated throughout the surrounding country leaving changes in … Continue reading

Posted in Tourism | Comments Off on Conservation at the Mohonk Mountain House

The Regal Fight for Storm King Mountain

By Madison A. Hayes Storm King Mountain is an imposing force along the Hudson River. The river itself has played a significant role in the Hudson River Valley for centuries, and Storm King has also been a part of this … Continue reading

Posted in Environmental Issues | Comments Off on The Regal Fight for Storm King Mountain

PCBs in the Hudson River: The Rehabilitation of a Superfund Site

By Maggie Hankins For centuries, the Hudson River has been well documented as one of the most important natural features in northeastern American history. Having been closely monitored almost continuously for the past 25 years, the Hudson now exists as … Continue reading

Posted in Environmental Issues | Comments Off on PCBs in the Hudson River: The Rehabilitation of a Superfund Site

Geography of Sing Sing Correctional Facility

By Gwen Frenzel New York State has long had a large proportion of its residents living in New York City. For a multitude of reasons, like discrimination against the impoverished and racial minority groups that are common in New York … Continue reading

Posted in Prisons | Comments Off on Geography of Sing Sing Correctional Facility

Choo Choo: A Guide to the History of Railroads in the Hudson Valley

By Jake Spies Once upon a time, transportation in the Hudson Valley was a challenge to say the least.  Traveling across the Hudson River was vital to trade, as a large percentage of American manufacturing was done in New York … Continue reading

Posted in Railroads | Comments Off on Choo Choo: A Guide to the History of Railroads in the Hudson Valley

American Shad Fishing on the Hudson River

By Marie Schmidt The American Shad, with its delicate flavor and history of abundance, has played a long and crucial role on the Hudson valley’s economy. As a natural resource with much potential, the fish have been caught shad as … Continue reading

Posted in Fishing and Whaling | Comments Off on American Shad Fishing on the Hudson River

Catskills Hikes and Climbs

By Ryne Pataki New York State is home to five mountain ranges, but only two, the Adirondacks and Catskills, are the tallest and most mountain-like. Instead of being intricately folded, most rocks that constitute the Catskill range feature horizontal strata. (See … Continue reading

Posted in Tourism | Comments Off on Catskills Hikes and Climbs

Sing Sing Correctional Facility: A Shift to More Humane Practices

By Molly Osborn As one of New York’s oldest prisons, picturesquely situated overlooking the Hudson River, Sing Sing Correctional Facility marks an important part of the Hudson Valley’s history. From the time the facility was first established in 1826 to … Continue reading

Posted in Prisons | Comments Off on Sing Sing Correctional Facility: A Shift to More Humane Practices

River of Life: Shad Fishing on the Hudson River

By Mai Nguyen Fishing is perhaps the most intimate relationship humans have with the Hudson River. The river has been a source of food and livelihoods for the local population and the East Coast’s most important source of shad fish … Continue reading

Posted in Fishing and Whaling | Comments Off on River of Life: Shad Fishing on the Hudson River