In this weekly feature, we will share our ideas for what you can do “off-campus” while the museum is closed. This week’s entry comes from Nicole M. Roylance, Coordinator of Public Education and Information.

A studio art class came to visit the museum once with the assignment to copy a work of art from the collection. As the teacher entered the galleries with his class, he pointed to Calder’s Circle and said, “This is the only one you cannot copy. It is too easy.”

Alexander Calder (American, 1898-1978) The Circle, 1934, Sheet aluminum, ceramic, wood, string and steel wire, Gift of Agnes Rindge Claflin, 1963.8

Alexander Calder (American, 1898-1978) The Circle, 1934, Sheet aluminum, ceramic, wood, string and steel wire, Gift of Agnes Rindge Claflin, 1963.8

The Circle is deceptive. The elements are easy, sure. But to craft a work of art with eternal tension and evolution? Not so easy.

To illustrate this point, try your hand at the addictive game of Levers. The player is presented with hangers and various doodads with the objective of maintaining balance. Clicking on hooks the player can move around the bowling ball, snowman, and submarine (not exactly what Calder would have used) to find the right balancing point. Everything counts as you strive to get the mobile to balance long enough to get to the next level. You learn that the amount of water in the bucket matters (you can let water out by clicking on the faucet or add water by dropping it in the pool below).

Make your own Calder (sort of).

Make your own Calder (sort of).

You can also download the free Levers app for your iPhone, iPod Touch, and iPad. Try it and see if you can bring some balance to your life.

Share