The official student-run blog of the Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center at Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, NY.
Exhibitions
Face to Face with Self-Taught Art

Face to Face with Self-Taught Art

Today’s post comes from Alex Raz, class of 2016 and Art Center Student Docent. FLLAC’s current exhibition is confrontational—and I’m not just referencing the show’s visually suggestive and potentially triggering content. In stating this, I’m thinking of the Art Center’s effort to join in a wider conversation on art typically outside of the mainstream, art that’s...
St. Jerome in Mastering Light: Illuminating Transience

St. Jerome in Mastering Light: Illuminating Transience

Today’s post comes from Chris Dietz, class of 2017 and Art Center Student Docent. The Art Center’s delightful new exhibition, Mastering Light: From the Natural to the Artificial, showcases one of the most interesting works in the permanent collection—the German master Albrecht Dürer’s St. Jerome in His Study. Albrecht Dürer (1471-1528) was arguably the greatest artist of...
Shedding Light on “Mastering Light”

Shedding Light on “Mastering Light”

Today’s post comes from Calvin Lamothe, class of 2017 and Art Center Student Docent.   On April 11 at 5:30pm, Vassar students, museum employees, and community members alike crowded into Taylor Hall to hear William Sharpe’s opening lecture for the Art Center’s current exhibition Mastering Light: From the Natural to the Artificial. Sharpe is a professor of...
Todd Knopke's Deluge

Todd Knopke’s Deluge

Come experience the pieces in person, or get a virtual sneak peek by clicking on this link!                           Two site-specific, large-scale fabric installations by artist Todd Knopke will be adorning the walls of the Atrium of the Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center. The collages will be on display March 28-July 20. The works are monumental, each measuring twenty-six feet...
Inuit Art from the Inside Out: Siassie Kenneally's Male Fish Gut

Inuit Art from the Inside Out: Siassie Kenneally’s Male Fish Gut

Today’s post comes from Pilar Jefferson, class of 2015 and Art Center Student Docent. Male Fish Gut—probably the last title you’d expect for a beautiful work of art. And yet there I was, standing in the Focus Gallery, one of the Art Center’s temporary exhibition spaces, completely entranced by what is for all intents and purposes...
Museology and Indigenous Art

Museology and Indigenous Art

Today’s post comes from Emily Whicheloe, class of 2014 and a student in Molly McGlennen’s course, “Decolonizing the Exhibition: Critical Approaches to Contemporary Indigenous Art.” Decolonizing the Exhibition: Contemporary Inuit Prints and Drawings from the Edward J. Guarino Collection is the result of a semester-long process of research and curation of contemporary Inuit prints and drawings...
A Legacy of Snapshots: The Lasting Influence of Polaroid

A Legacy of Snapshots: The Lasting Influence of Polaroid

Today’s post comes from Pilar Jefferson, class of 2015 and Art Center Summer Docent. As a member of the Millennial generation I’ve always thought of Polaroids as a passing curiosity. Of course I am not unique in this. With the rise of digital photography and the simultaneous decline of the Polaroid Corporation, which declared bankruptcy in...
Embracing His Work: Rembrandt’s Goldsmith

Embracing His Work: Rembrandt’s Goldsmith

Today’s post comes from Alec Aldrich, class of 2015 and Art Center volunteer. Rembrandt van Rijn’s The Goldsmith (1655) was the smallest work in the Art Center’s winter exhibition, Recent Acquisitions: Works on Paper, but it was well worth the viewer’s attention. The intaglio print joins the ranks of numerous other intaglio prints by the artist that are at...
Laylah Ali: Bridging the Gap Between Two- and Three-Dimensional Space

Laylah Ali: Bridging the Gap Between Two- and Three-Dimensional Space

Today’s post comes from Olivia Zisman, class of 2016 and Art Center Student Docent. Laylah Ali’s print, Untitled, in the Recent Acquisitions: Works on Paper exhibition, brings three-dimensional motion to a two-dimensional space. The image itself suggests flatness, showing round creatures suspended in space right up against the picture plane. The creatures—although somewhat simple-looking—are meticulously rendered...
Post-War Culture of the Defeated

Post-War Culture of the Defeated

At the conclusion of World War I, Germany suffered terrible financial and social backlash from the rest of Europe. Veterans and civilians alike struggled to pick up the pieces and move on from wartime. War profiteers in Berlin lived sumptuously, in high contrast with the wounded veterans and families who outlived their primary breadwinner. Impoverished...
Photography, Environment, and Politics: Sawdust Mountain

Photography, Environment, and Politics: Sawdust Mountain

The Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center actively encourages faculty and students from across all departments and programs to view the art collection as a teaching tool and the galleries as a learning site. Perhaps this is nowhere more evident than in this fall’s half-semester course, “Photography, Environment, and Politics: Sawdust Mountain.” The course, which is...
Opening Night of Sawdust Mountain

Opening Night of Sawdust Mountain

Today’s post comes from Erin Gallagher, class of 2013 and Art Center Student Docent. Friday, September 7, was the opening of the exhibition, Eirik Johnson: Sawdust Mountain. The evening kicked off with a lecture, “Wanderings Along the Makeshift Landscape,” by the artist. As he took us through his early formative experiences with photography, sharing a tale...