Commencement Inspiration, and Congrats Vassar Class of ’15!

The whole CAAD team wishes the Vassar class of ’15 a hearty congratulations on their achievements, and best wishes for the next steps! For a little commencement preview, we bring you NPR’s pretty amazing new app that features the best of college commencement speeches since 1774 (including a few from Vassar’s commencements). Looking for a Read more about Commencement Inspiration, and Congrats Vassar Class of ’15![…]

Field Work: From Oreos to Pianos, a Look into Britomartis’ Nocturne

Beginning of the Spring semester, Britomartis had a meeting to plan the spring production. It is commonly known, as Derek Butterton has explained to us freshly inducted Britomartians, that every show is a reaction to the last. During the fall we presented Vile Bodies, a devised piece with Evelyn Waugh’s novel by the same name Read more about Field Work: From Oreos to Pianos, a Look into Britomartis’ Nocturne[…]

Creativity Breadcrumb 55: Six-Word Poems

food for creative making, doing, and thinking One of Ernest Hemingway’s most famous stories contains a mere six words. They read: In 2015, flash fiction and micro-fiction are popular writing forms, and contribute to the blurring of lines between prose and poetry. Literary magazines often put out contests or even submission guidelines for entire issues Read more about Creativity Breadcrumb 55: Six-Word Poems[…]

Podcast of the Week 24: On Podcasts, Senses, and Mental Health

“For listeners who may be too ill to relate to others face to face, or can’t find the language for their own feelings, these aural connections can be essential, even life-altering.” — Whitney Matheson I came across Slate’s “Speaking the Unspeakable” article recently, and in line with the article, thought it’d be important for us Read more about Podcast of the Week 24: On Podcasts, Senses, and Mental Health[…]

Field Work: Daguerreotypes and Beyond: The Past, Present, and Future of Photography

This month, the Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center houses what is considered to be “the most extensive exhibition of European and American daguerreotypes ever in the northeast,” titled Through the Looking Glass. The daguerreotype and the process of producing it was invented by Louis Daguerre in 1839, and is considered to be not only the earliest Read more about Field Work: Daguerreotypes and Beyond: The Past, Present, and Future of Photography[…]