Making Posters and Fliers at Vassar Spring 2018

by Baynard Bailey

Making Posters at Vassar Presentation (link requires VC gmail login)

illustrator environment pencil imac

You can use any software you like to create posters or fliers. The most common applications used are Adobe Illustrator and MS Powerpoint. The goal is to create a .pdf that can be shared with the printer. Adobe Illustrator is available in the library electronic classroom and the 24 hour space of the library (AKA DMZ).

Here are some ACS created tutorials for creating academic posters with Adobe Illustrator:

  1. Graphic Design Tutorial (12 minutes)
  2. Illustrator Tutorial (25 minutes)
  3. Exporting Tutorial (4 minutes)

Print jobs smaller 11″x17″ or smaller go to the Copy Center, and can be picked up at the post office counter in college center.

Print jobs larger than 11″x17″ go to Media Resources, which is in the basement of the College Center. Further details and to submit a print job please visit https://servicedesk.vassar.edu/catalog_items/307242-poster-request

If you would like to arrange training for faculty or classes, please email acs@vassar.edu

If you are hosting a poster event or poster session, please contact campus activities to reserve their foam boards and/or easels: campusactivities@vassar.edu

I’ve helped many classes create posters for academic purposes. Here are various poster sets created by students I’ve trained (some links require VC login):

 For additional inspiration, here are some useful links:

For a list of upcoming public workshops keep an eye the events listed in our Moodle site or visit http://pages.vassar.edu/dissco/events/

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Digital Storytelling Work at Vassar

I love teaching digital storytelling workshops to classes at Vassar. The students seem to enjoy it and the faculty are pretty happy with the results. Departments include French, Japanese, Psychology, Education and Anthropology. I was reviewing students’ examples in preparation for the upcoming LACOL panel and I was blown away by all the amazing and diverse work done by the students.

Here’s a quick summary of the kinds of digital storytelling projects that I have helped classes with over the years:

French – Digital Storybooks for FREN 206 with Mark Andrews, Tom Parker and Susan Hiner.

Japanese – Digital Storybooks for 200- and 300-level courses with Peipei Qiu and Hiromi Dollase.

Psychology – End-of-term research presentations with Mark Cleaveland’s students

Education – Semester-long collaborations with Adolescent Literacy students and their middle school partners (workshops every week)

Anthropology – A variety of uses, including digital ethnographies and engaged research

We use Final Cut Pro X at Vassar for these classes. FCP X is a powerful and easy-to-use editor. It is available in the Library’s Electronic Classroom and Digital Media Zone. Students with Macs can get a 30-day free trial license.

The goals vary by classes. Sometimes the professor wants a rich medium to tell a story. In Mark’s class, he wanted polished presentations that acted as crucibles to bring together all their research. For 

Lessons Learned:

  • Provide lots of support
  • Don’t assume the students know how to do things
  • Sound is more important than video
  • Things improve with iteration
  • Set clear expectations 
  • More faculty / instructional technologist collaboration is better
  • It is helpful if the faculty member can model or provide examples
  • Allow time for things to go wrong
  • Try to keep track of where you put things
  • Measure success by faculty “happiness” level

This is an example of a digital ethnography.

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This was produced for community engaged research:

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This is an example from a final group project for a Psychology class.

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French 206

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Japanese stories (behind Moodle login Moodle

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